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My voice
  Brand obsession  
 

BRABIM KARKI

Recently, while I was walking down Durbar Marg with friends, one of them excitedly announced, “Look at this shirt I’m wearing. It’s one of my favorite brands. It’s worth Rs 6,000. I bought it at Sherpa Mall.”

He told us all about his other favorite stores, like John Players and U.F.O, to name a few. He also pointed out the new pair of Adidas shoes he was wearing. He then went on to show us the other accessories he was wearing. All of them, we were told, were very expensive.

He looked me up and down and asked, “Where did you buy your shirt?”

I looked at my shirt and replied, “I bought this along the footpath at Sundhara last night.”

Needless to say, he was in shock to learn that I didn’t buy my clothes exclusively from Sherpa Mall and City Center or any other chic malls, though that’s not to say that I haven’t visited those places. He asked me why I didn’t shop there. I replied sarcastically, “Because Sherpa Mall doesn’t have the clothes of my favorite brands. As soon as they introduce the brands of my choice, I will surely go there.”

For many people living in the metro, wearing branded and high-priced clothing is the only way to look fashionable. They visit different malls and even order items from abroad. Visiting high-profile malls and shopping for branded clothing isn’t bad but it’s worth exploring the rest of the city’s offerings, too.

Let’s visit our tiny shops and footpath markets. Who knows, they may even have the styles of clothes you’re looking for. With these options available, is it necessary to wander through the expensive racks of pricey stores and order from abroad? Clothing bought on the street may not be expensive, but often the quality of these items can be just as good as those with brand names.



Along the walk, my friend pointed at KFC and said, “I often go there for lunch. I don’t like eating at other establishments. Have you been to KFC? Their foods are hygienic and top class. You should visit it more often,” he suggested, as if any restaurant without an international name were far inferior.

Is this obsession with brands and high-priced items the only way of living the so called ‘standard’ life and looking fashionable? If so, then I prefer not to be fashionable.

Fashion is a form of self expression. Wearing expensive clothes doesn’t ensure a sense of style, and eating at expensive restaurants doesn’t ensure the best tasting foods, either.
As for my particular friend in this story, I prefer to call him ‘a brand and a price tag,’ not someone in tune with fashion. It’s not all about shopping for branded clothes and going to expensive cafes. We can look good and fashionable in low-priced clothing, and nothing is better than a delicious meal at affordable prices.

The writer is a graduate of Chartered Accountancy from the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nepal.

 
Published on 2013-11-09 08:52:09
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Thank you, I also think it is a compensation for frustration there is no hope in their limited depressed mind and the look in the mirror compensates the missing career or projections of other happinesses. It is all in the mind, but a 3 piece suit is not SLC. Appearance and looks are so superficial but helpful in climbing a ladder, we need to respect poor people and develop compassion. [more]
  - MARJOLAINE hOHBERGER
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